Tag Archives: World War One

An exciting discovery

It wasn’t discovered by me, but I was privileged to co-author the publication in Creative Fibre magazine in September 2016.

There are all sorts of questions that face a spinning wheel designer – from simple questions like horizontal or upright, three legs or four,  to subtleties like proportions, drive mechanism, tension, ratios, and the complex interactions of moving parts. Have you noticed how many of the best makers have a background in engineering?

The variety and ingenuity of the answers makers come up with are endlessly fascinating (I think this is why I keep studying spinning wheels). Ingenuity is particularly called on in times of war, when need is urgent but materials are scarce.

So here it is – a friction drive wheel from World War One.

Note: a slightly more detailed account (with footnotes even!) will be published in the Spinning Wheel Sleuth later this year.

More …

Here is another article, an appropriate one at this time I hope. There has been a lot of commemoration of the struggles and sufferings of those who fought in what used to be called “the Great War”. Much less is heard about the efforts of the women left at home – indeed, relatively little is known about them. But a hundred years ago women were toiling and making sacrifices to support the war effort, just as they did later in World War 2.

More about Chapman-Taylor and his elusive wheels can be found in Chapter 5 of the book, and at http://www.nzspinningwheels.info/norwegian.html#C-T

I have also added an “About me” – partly as an excuse to show you some nice scenery.